Species Account

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Distribution


 
 

Summary Data


Season (Adult / Immature):

National Status: Local

Local Status: Scarce and restricted resident.

Local Record: Grade 3   See here for explanation

Flight time: Jul-Aug.

Forewing: 15-18mm.

Foodplant: Sea Campion, Thrift, Common Rock-rose.

IMPORTANT - Please note that the maps and accounts are provisional, subject to change and further update.  The whole dataset still needs to go through the final verification process and it is likely that a very small number of records will not satisfy the present requirements and there are other records that have not been formally submitted.  The information is for guidance only.

Record breakdown:

 VC9VC11Region
Year first recorded188419821884
Year last recorded201119962011
Number of records1684344
Number of individuals36711756
Unique positions893184
Unique locations573120
Adult records1394286
Immature records000

For the region, we have a total of 344 records from 120 sites. Earliest record on file is in 1884.
 

Photos


1964 Annulet 02
© Dave Shenton
1964 Annulet 01
© Dave Foot

Species Account


For further information refer UK Moths.

Davey, P., 2009: A species mainly confined to the British coastline, but also found locally inland across southern Britain, the larva feeding on heather (Calluna spp.), trefoil (Lotus spp.), common rock-rose (Heliathemum nummularium), cinquefoil (Potentilla spp.), and other herbaceous plants. In Dorset, the moth colonises two distinctly different A species mainly confined to the British coastline, but also found locally inland across southern Britain, the larva feeding on heather (Calluna spp.), trefoil (Lotus spp.), common rock-rose (Heliathemum nummularium), cinquefoil (Potentilla spp.), and other herbaceous plants. In Dorset, the moth colonises two distinctly different biotypes. The first is damp heathland across the Poole Basin where heather and marsh cinquefoil (Potentilla palustris) are potential host foodplants. The other is the coastal belt of Purbeck, Portland and west Dorset where Fabaceae (vetches, trefoils, pea and clover) species grow in abundance within unimproved calcareous grassland. The moth occurs in the two biotypes in equal numbers, although it is common only very locally. It has yet to be found inland on chalky soils despite the presence of many potential host foodplant species. The Annulet is something of a chameleon as the ground colour of members of a given colony tends to blend in with the tone of their surroundings. Moths are darkest (ab. obscuriorata) on the peaty soils in the mires at Morden Bog, Bryantspuddle Heath and Stoborough Heath, and lightest (ab. calceata) on the chalk cliffs at Arish Mell and Ballard Down.
 

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