Species Account

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Distribution


 
 

Summary Data


Season (Adult / Immature):

National Status: Common

Local Status: Probably uncommon, but unknown due vast majority undetermined.

Local Record: Grade G   See here for explanation

Flight time: One generation, May-Jul, (Sep-Oct).

Forewing: 17-20mm.

Foodplant: Broadleaved trees and shrubs.

IMPORTANT - Please note that the maps and accounts are provisional, subject to change and further update.  The whole dataset still needs to go through the final verification process and it is likely that a very small number of records will not satisfy the present requirements and there are other records that have not been formally submitted.  The information is for guidance only.

Record breakdown:

 VC9VC11Region
Year first recorded198419851984
Year last recorded201120012011
Number of records2515512
Number of individuals27325596
Unique positions26256
Unique locations25254
Adult records2075424
Immature records102

For the region, we have a total of 512 records from 54 sites. Earliest record on file is in 1984.
 

Photos


sorry, no pictures available for this species yet
 

Species Account


For further information refer UK Moths.

Davey, P., 2009: A widespread species in south-east Britain, becoming scarce further north, the larva feeding on hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna), blackthorn (Prunus spp.), sallow (Salix spp.), apple (Malus spp.), wild rose (Rosa canina) and other deciduous trees and shrubs. "There are, in my opinion, two methods of distinguishing this species from the Grey Dagger2284 with absolute certainty: breeding from larva, and dissecting out the genitalia. Anything less than either method leads to error." (W Parkinson Curtis ms). Given this difficulty in identifying these two Daggers, no attempt has been made to assess each status suffice it to say that this species has a preference for hawthorn and rosaeceae plants, and is therefore likely to be common on chalky soils where hawthorn and dog rose are dominant amongst scrub. Elsewhere, it is probably at low density in town gardens where fruit trees are grown.
 

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